The Worlds Most Trafficked Mammal

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The Worlds Most Trafficked Mammal

Prita Jacobs, Journalist

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 A shy harmless creature called a pangolin is becoming largely known for one reason: they’re the worlds most trafficked non – human animal/mammal. An estimated 100,000 of pangolins are either taken from the wild or poached, places in China and Vietnam consider pangolin meat a wealthy delicacy. Pangolins have about 1,000 scales, when a pangolin feels threatened they roll up into a ball and let their scales protect them from predators, but cruel people decide to rip pangolin scales off of pangolins in parts of Africa and Asia and trade the scales or use them for traditional medicine that is fake and doesn’t work. No one knows how many pangolins are left in the world, but scientists and activists say the number is shrinking fast. “Roughly 50 tons of illegal pangolin scales have been seized globally in the last four months.” Estimated Peter Knights, the CEO of WildAid, an advocacy group. Researchers estimate that an equivalent of 110,182 pangolins have been confiscated by law enforcement this year so far- a 54.5% increase on last year. All 8 subspecies of the shy animal are at risk of extinction scientists say. When pangolins disappear, so does the ecological balance in their natural habitats. There is still a little bit of good news about pangolins, in the year of 2016, a treaty of over 180 governments announced an agreement that would end all global trade of pangolin scales. However, sadly the illegal trade continues. 

 Want to help pangolins? You can’t do much, but you can find a good pangolin website and donate!  

 

                                                          PANGOLIN VIDEOS 

                                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqC3ieJJlFM 

                                                  https://youtu.be/ohQv5lQsvyg  

                                                  https://youtu.be/QY1qqZiaTU8  

 

                                                                  SOURCES 

Waterman, Robert. “What Is a Pangolin?” WWF, World Wildlife Fund,                      www.worldwildlife.org/stories/what-is-a-pangolin.

 “Pangolins.” WildAid, 2018, https://wildaid.org/programs/pangolins/.

“Pangolins.” Pangolin Facts and Information, 10 Apr. 2019, www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/group/pangolins/.

“Pangolins.” Pangolin Facts and Information, 10 Apr. 2019, www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/group/pangolins/.